Category: Microsoft 365

Do you need a plan for how you can (and should) migrate files to Office 365?

How hard can it be? (my favorite phrase, in addition to “It depends”)

Isn’t it just about opening Windows Explorer and dragging over the files where they should be? Or can you not only use a script or a tool to copy all files to SharePoint and then start cleaning? Continue reading “Do you need a plan for how you can (and should) migrate files to Office 365?”

Classic or Modern? Part 1: Who are You?

We all have different personalities and different preferences. In this small series of blog posts, we will look more closely at how we set ourselves to different technologies and solutions and how to implement and use different solutions in Office 365 so that you can really improve the satisfaction and quality of an organization. Continue reading “Classic or Modern? Part 1: Who are You?”

How “What’s New for me” can become “What’s new for Us”.

How do i stay updated?

In Office 365 there are a lot of news and updates all the time and it is hard to stay on top of all the stuff you need to be aware of in order to be able to plan for upcoming changes. I do my very best to stay updated on what’s new within the workloads/services that are most relevant to me and my customers. My primary sources are The fabulous “Microsoft Community”, Microsoft 365 Roadmap, Office 365 Message Center, Twitter and LinkedIn.

For me it is important to share news, updates, findings, opportunities, obstacles and general knowledge about Office 365 and most of its services. I share it with Customers, Colleagues and the Community. For me this is the best way to learn and it is also of a great value for me that my customers are informed and updated so that we have a common understanding and thus can have a dialogue on how to manage and implement everything new. Continue reading “How “What’s New for me” can become “What’s new for Us”.”

Oh no! What has happened to my files !!!

An accident happens so easily.

What if your files are deleted or overwritten? They may even become corrupt or in the worst case infected with malicious software. It starts to creep in the body and whizzes in the ears. The butterflies begin to flaunt in your stomach and the sweat rushes into your forehead. What in the world should you do now?

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

If you work on a local disk, a common file area on a traditional file server or on another platform, your panic condition may be justified, but if you work in Office 365 you can very likely take a deep breath, wipe the sweat away and relatively easily fix the problem.

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If your files are located in OneDrive

You probably/hopefully already know that using the function “File Restore” in OneDrive, you can restore your OneDrive to the state it had in an earlier date (within 30 days back in time). This functionality has been available for quite some time now, but there are still many “regular” users who are not yet familiar with this.

If you are not already familiar with this functionality, you can read more about this in the article “Restore your OneDrive

If your files are located in SharePoint or Microsoft Teams

A very good information, which was communicated a few days ago, is that now the functionality “Files restore for SharePoint and Microsoft Teams” will soon be launched. The functionality is very similar to the one you already have in OneDrive. I recommend that you read the article “Restore a document library” and familiarize yourself with the possibilities and limitations.

Are you keen to read more about news in SharePoint and you will find a lot of candy in Mark Kasman’s article “SharePoint Roadmap Pitstop: April 2019“.

With this good news, I wish you a continued good and productive working day knowing that your files are in safe hands and that the good platform you already use continuously, and with increasing speed, only gets better and better.

 

Why do you continue to send (and reply to) email?

The times are changing, we as individuals are changing and so are the technology and the tools we use. I’m still using my email client, but it’s mostly about my calendar.

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Of course, I’m still sending emails, but it’s basically for communication with companies and organizations that don’t yet have access to modern communication tools, or that we haven’t yet invited them to any of our collaboration solutions. I now only have the daily communication with my colleagues and my customers through Microsoft Teams.

“What is it that Microsoft Teams give me who has made me, in such a short time, able to reduce (read stop) the use of email as the primary communication channel?”

I now have one (1) “work surface” to relate to.

  • I have stopped using Skype. Microsoft Teams give me everything I need. I have Group discussions and “file sharing”, with colleagues and customers in the team where we work together. I have private conversations with colleagues and customers through private chat in Microsoft Teams.
  • When it comes to Video meetings and Screen Sharing I can choose to do either in a  conversation in a channel or via private chat. I can also plan-, invite to- and have Team Meetings with much better quality than I could ever do via Skype.
  • All history of conversations and chats are stored, and I can easily retrieve a previous dialogue to update the memory of what was said or agreed. Now I don’t have to look for sent and received emails.
  • I can comment on documents in the place (the Channel) where the document and the comments belong. I no longer need to (but I still can) write comments in the documents or use “track changes”. Best of all, I never need to send email with attached files to get feedback on the contents of the files. I just ask the group members for a comment directly through the chat connected to the document.
  • I can easily call for attention by “mentioning” some people or those who follow a channel or all members of the entire team.
  • In each Team you can have one or more “Planners” where you can handle the tasks related to the work. One can also have one or more notebooks (OneNote) where you write notes from meetings etc.
  • I can follow what is most relevant to me and I can choose to follow or “hide” things that are not directly relevant to the work I am going to do.
  • I can choose what i want to get notified about (and how often), thus reducing the disturbances in everyday life. If I get a notice, I know it’s because it’s of importance for me.

“With more control and less interference, I can focus on what’s important and relevant to me. (As a bonus, I am also less tired when the working day is over.)”

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I have taken control of my priorities. I am no longer disturbed by email notifications that appear all day. I can focus on what is important to me, and I have control over the dialogues I have with customers and colleagues. I know where to find the documents I need.

I will certainly continue to use email for a some more years, but only when I need to. I can’t imagine going back to using email for internal communication or dialogue with customers who are “inside the system”.

What about you?

How many hours, per day, do you use to send and reply to email messages? Maybe you should consider using Microsoft Teams? I guarantee that it is worth testing and I’m pretty sure you won’t regret it.

Awareness does not hurt but not bothering will cause pain sooner or later.

You brush your teeth every day to avoid getting toothache (and thus expensive and painful dental visits) but do you care for your information and your devices at work just as well to avoid future pain and costs?

Can you be sure that your company has taken all necessary steps to protect the information you store and work with? Sometimes the answer is YES but often it is difficult to be absolutely sure of it. Whether it is expressed formally or informally, you have a personal responsibility for, and interest in helping to secure your own- and your company’s information. You as an individual can- and should contribute to information security by using the security mechanisms / controls offered by Office 365 and Windows 10. It may sound complicated but You do not need to be an information security expert to help keeping things (information and/or devices) that are important safe and protected.

It is usually the users who are the weakest link. Make sure you become a strong link
It is usually the users who are the weakest link. Make sure you become a strong link!

To get an overview of what you can do to stay secure and private at work you should download the infographic “Stay safe and secure“. Here You will get some great and easy-to-use tips of how You can protect your files, manage file sharing, secure your devices, scan for threats and also how to recover your OneDrive after ransomware, file corruption or accidental deletes and edits.

Have a safe working day!

Do not underestimate the power of well-planned and well-performed user adoption

I have been working with Office 365 since it was launched and since then I have been involved in several projects that involve the implementation of Office 365.
Some have gone very well, some quite OK and some have gone less well.
There is a common denominator for those who have gone very well and it is well-planned (and well-performed) user adoption.

“well-planned (and well-performed) user adoption.”

It has now almost become a cliche that it is the business that should be in focus during planning and implementation, but it cannot be emphasized enough times how important it is that user adoption must be in focus already from the start.
business-2584713_1920In the end, it is the satisfied user who creates the good results. It’s their voices we hear in the corridors and at the coffee machine. It is they who, with commitment and with the right tools, will produce results. It is their feedback and their achieved results that are the yardsticks of whether we succeeded or not.

The organizations that do not realize this and act accordingly will not succeed in implementing successful projects that give the desired effect. They will (more or less fail).loser-3096225_1920.jpg

 

Do You want to learn more about user adoption? Luise Freese has written a great post with the topic “Achieving Sustainable Adoption of Microsoft 365” and i recommend that you read it.